Industry News

The Circular Building opens its doors to the public

On the occasion of the London Design Festival 2016, The Building Centre, Arup, The Built Environment Trust, Frener & Reifer and BAM have teamed up to create The Circular Building.

The installation - raised in front of The Building Centre in London and open to the public Monday - Saturday 10am - 5pm - intends to explore how we might apply circular economy principles to the design and construction of buildings.

The Circular Building offers a solid example of how we might:

- Lease rather than purchase materials and products

- Maximise off-site fabrication

- Select materials that can be re-used, remanufactured or recycled at end of life

- Choose mechanical and push-fit connections rather than adhesives to allow deconstruction

- Avoid wet trades

- Design fit-out to comprise interchangeable panels leased from suppliers

- Ventilation provided by prototype equipment made from recycled plastic, cardboard and re-manufactured drinks cans

- Electrical system is low voltage and off-grid, facilitating future flexibility and ease-of-maintenance

The installation is also accompanied by Circular Living - an exhibition exploring the impact of the circular economy in a range of industries, from fashion to product design- and by the conference 'Circular economy in the built environment' to take place on 21 September 2016.

Further information is available here.

 

[News URL: http://www.cti-timber.org/content/circular-building-opens-its-doors-public]

Innovative CLT tulipwood structure 'The Smile' to be unveiled at London Design Festival

The American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) has collaborated with Alison Brooks Architects, Arup and the London Design Festival to present a cross-laminated tulipwood structure, ‘The Smile’ at the Chelsea College of Art Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground from 17 September until 12 October.

The Smile is one of the Festival’s Landmark Projects, which can be inhabited and explored by the public. The spectacular, curved, tubular timber structure measures 3.5m high, 4.5m wide and 34m long and is effectively a beam curving up at both ends. Showcasing the structural and spatial potential of cross-laminated American tulipwood, Alison Brooks' concept is the first ever ‘mega-tube’ made with construction-sized panels of hardwood CLT.

The Smile is the first project in the world to use large hardwood CLT panels, in fact the entire structure is made from just 12 huge tulipwood panels, each up to 14m long and 4.5m wide. Fabricating these panels in a real CLT production plant has been an important step forward, showcasing how the material can be used for commercial projects.

Architect Alison Brooks said: "The Smile’s form itself is an invitation to test whether the pavilion moves, and how it feels to walk in on a curved floor. A single door and ramp from the square invites visitors to enter – something like our archetypal image of Noah’s Ark. Inside the door light spilling from the ends of the arc will invite you to walk up the slope of the curve to balconies at either end, rather like looking out from the rail of a ship."

For more infomation click here.

View the Gallery here.

 

[News URL: http://www.cti-timber.org/content/innovative-clt-tulipwood-structure-smile-be-unveiled-london-design-festival]

Metsä Wood launches international competition to redesign cities in wood

Metsä Wood has launched a new international design competition called The City Above The City to explore how timber construction can tackle the problems of urbanisation.

The Awards are the next phase of the company’s Plan B initiative, a project focused on realising iconic architectural designs - including the Roman Colisseum and the Empire State Building - out of wood.

“Cities all over the world are in dire need of new ways to house a rapidly growing urban population,” the company said. “The City Above the City international wood design competition invites architects and students from all over the world to solve the challenges of urbanization in both sustainable and humane ways.”

“We need to start building up, and stop tearing down. We have an alternative. A building extension constructed with a timber frame can be a fast, sustainable and inexpensive solution,” said Michael Green of Vancouver-based Michael Green Architects, a member of the competition judging panel."

The entrants are encouraged to select a centrally-located building in one of the world’s most populated cities and develop an innovative wood design solution that adds density through additional floors. Building additional floors with Kerto LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber) as the primary material is a central requirement for the design work. Preferred cities include London, Berlin, Paris, Washington, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Istanbul and Shanghai.

The design should either integrate with an existing structure or knit itself into the urban fabric of the city. Entrants are challenged to propose construction systems that draw on the performance characteristics of a variety of wood technologies.

The competition will be evaluated by an international jury with extensive in-depth expertise in wood structure architecture and sustainable design. 

The deadline for submitting projects for the City Above the City design competition is 30th of September 2016.

Further information are available here.

 

[News URL: http://www.cti-timber.org/content/mets%C3%A4-wood-launches-international-competition-redesign-cities-wood]

Construction of Vienna 24-storey wood building to start this Spring

Image courtesy of http://www.hoho-wien.at/Construction of the world's tallest wood building will start this spring in Vienna, Austria. 

When completed in 2017, the 'HoHo building' will have 24 storeys, surpassing by far 'The Tree', a 14-storey residential building under construction in Bergen, Norway

The wood high-rise is located in Seestadt Aspern northeast of Vienna by the Seepark park. With a height of roughly 84 metres and an estimated cost of £50 million, roughly 75 percent of the building will be made of wood. The service core will be constructed of solid reinforced concrete to which the timber supporting structure is secured.

 "Wood is a natural choice in Austria, because more of it grows than is used. Wood is cost-effective, it saves resources, it has high acceptability and wood surfaces create a natural atmosphere in indoor spaces. We have developed a technical wood construction system that enables construction of tall buildings", architect and planner Rudiger Lainer said.

"The starting point is to realise the building as efficiently as possible. We combine wood construction with concrete construction and with this synergy we strive for the best possible solution from the standpoint of building regulations, quality, cost-efficiency, fire safety and flexibility," Lainer added.

To read the complete interview with Mr Laner click here.

Visit the project website at www.hoho-wien.at.

[Image courtesy of www.hoho-wien.at.]